Archive

Archive for the ‘Butterfly species’ Category

Carleton University Butterfly Exhibition 2012 – Day 7

October 5th, 2012 1 comment

Carleton University Butterfly Exhibition 2012 – Day 7

Although there have been a few moments when the weather has appeared to be  a bit threatening, and a few moments of apprehension when umbrellas  had to be unfurled, the weather has so far cooperated and those in the line-ups at the greenhouses have had pretty decent weather. During this same period, my father passed away and thus my planned visits to the greenhouses had to be curtailed.  Today, however, the greenhouses were on my route and a stop of an hour was in order. Read more…

Carleton University Butterfly Exhibit 2012 – starts Saturday

September 28th, 2012 2 comments

Carleton University Butterfly Exhibit 2012

This is a repost of the original August 29th, 2012 posting. I am hoping to get to the exhibit a few times in the next week. Will be adding links to any additional uploaded images as the next week progresses.

DSC_9177-head-on
Ed Bruggink of the Carleton University Biology Department has confirmed this week that final preparations are underway for another “Live” Tropical Butterfly event September 29th to October 8th inclusive in the H.H. Nesbitt Biology Building on the Carleton University campus. (Location) Read more…

Butterflies – Silver-spotted Skipper – Epargyreus clarus

August 31st, 2012 No comments

Butterflies – Silver-spotted Skipper – Epargyreus clarus

_LND2681-Silver-Spotted-Ski

Butterflies – Viceroy – Limenitis archippus

August 31st, 2012 No comments

Butterflies – Viceroy – Limenitis archippus

_LND2973-Viceroy-butterfly

  Read more…

Butterflies – Owl – Caligo memnon

August 31st, 2012 No comments

Butterflies – Owl – Caligo memnon

Photographed at Butterfly World in Fort Lauderdale, Florida in 2011

The Owl Butterfly is  a large butterfly (10 – 15 cm) that is commonly on display in butterfly exhibits. The adults feed on fruit juices so are easy to entice to come to an outstretched hand if that hand happens to be holding a piece of orange or a nice bit of over-ripe banana. In their normal range of the Amazon rainforest north into Mexico, the caterpillar stage of this large butterfly can become a pest in banana plantations where they happily munch on banana plants. The large “eye” on the wing of the Owl Butterfly can’t see anything but serves as a defense mechanism in that any attacker may be fooled into striking at the eye on the wing and miss the butterfly’s body. The other thought is that the eye is a mimic mechanism expected to fool possible predators into thinking that the butterfly is a real owl rather than a potential meal.

 

*****

*****

Butterflies – Common Green Birdwing – Ornithoptera priamus

August 31st, 2012 No comments

Butterflies – Common Green Birdwing – Ornithoptera priamus

Photographed at Butterfly World in Fort Lauderdale, Florida in 2011. The Birdwing has many subspecies identified since it is a native of Indonesia and North east Asia where many islands have provided opportunities for members of the species to develop independently and differentiate sufficiently to develop enough difference to warrant sub-speciation. THis butterfly ranges in size from about

_EMG2493-blog-birdwing-fema

 

*****

*****

Butterflies – Orange Dead Leaf – Kalima inachus

August 31st, 2012 No comments

Butterflies – Orange Dead Leaf – Kalima inachus

 

_EMG3467-kalima

Photographed at the Butterfly exhibit in the Tennessee Aquarium in Chattanooga, Tennessee in 2011.

The Leaf Butterflies or Dead Leaf Butterflies, as they are also called, are brush-footed butterflies (Nymphalidae) occur naturally in the tropical forest regions of India through to Japan.  They rely heavily on their camouflage appearance and, whether in the trees or fallen onto the ground, their shape and their dorsal coloration allows them to blend in well in the trees or on the muddy or dry ground.   They have two generations per year generally coinciding with the dry season and the wet season.

 

*****

*****

Butterflies – Tiger Longwing – Heliconius ismenius

August 31st, 2012 No comments

Butterflies – Tiger Longwing – Heliconius ismenius

_EMG3458-Tiger-Longwing

Photographed at the Butterfly exhibit in the Tennessee Aquarium in Chattanooga, Tennessee in 2011.

The Tiger Longwing, also referred to as the Ismenius Longwing and various other similar combinations of the two is a brush-footed butterfly which lives naturally in Central America in a range reaching south into Venezuela and north into the southern reaches of Mexico. The Tiger Longwing’s flashy orange and black colors are an indication that the butterfly has some other way to protect itself from predators.  In this butterfly’s case, the form of protection comes from the chemicals of the host food Passiflora sp. that the larvae integrate into their tissues and which are passed along to the adult stage.

_EMG3464-Tiger-Longwing

 

*****

*****

Butterflies – Cydno Longwing – Heliconius cydno

August 31st, 2012 No comments

Butterflies – Cydno Longwing – Heliconius cydno

_EMG3463-Cydno-Longwing

Photographed at the Butterfly exhibit in the Tennessee Aquarium in Chattanooga, Tennessee in 2011.

The Cydno Longwing occurs naturally in Central America south to the northern reaches of Venezuela and along the west coast of South America to areas of Ecuador. As is the case with many other longwings, the larvae of the Cydno Longwing will incorporate chemicals from some of the plants that it consumes such as the Passiflora sp. and render the adult form of the butterfly somewhat less palatable to its potential predators. A number of the longwings which share this charactersitic also share similar colorations.  This form of mimicry where two or more species share similar warning colorations to alert predators that they are not palatable is referred to as Mullerian mimicry. Another fairly common form of mimicry is referred to as Batesian mimicry and involves a non-toxic prey species mimicing a toxic species.  The relationship between the Viceroy Butterfly and the Monarch butterfly is a good example of Batesian mimicry.  In the case of the the many orange and black colored Longwings, it is suspected that both Mullerian and Batesian mimicry may be in play.

 

*****

*****

Butterflies – Monarch Butterfly – Danaus plexippus

August 31st, 2012 No comments

Butterflies – Monarch Butterfly – Danaus plexippus

The above image of a Male Monarch butterfly was taken at the Butterfly site of the Adirondack Park Interpretive Center.

Read more…

%d bloggers like this: